Original Research

Best practice guidelines for stroke in Cameroon: An innovative and participatory knowledge translation project

Lynn Cockburn, Timothy N. Fanfon, Alexa Bramall, Eta M. Ngole, Pius Kuwoh, Emmanuel Anjonga, Brenda M.E. Difang, Shirin Kiani, Petra S. Muso, Navjyot Trivedi, Julius Sama, Sylvian Teboh
African Journal of Disability | Vol 3, No 1 | a92 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ajod.v3i1.92 | © 2014 Lynn Cockburn, Timothy N. Fanfon, Alexa Bramall, Eta M. Ngole, Pius Kuwoh, Emmanuel Anjonga, Brenda M.E. Difang, Shirin Kiani, Petra S. Muso, Navjyot Trivedi, Julius Sama, Sylvian Teboh | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 23 October 2013 | Published: 21 November 2014

About the author(s)

Lynn Cockburn, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Canada
Timothy N. Fanfon, Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Board, Bamenda, Cameroon
Alexa Bramall, Undergraduate Medical Education MD Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada
Eta M. Ngole, Buildings Bridges Cameroon (BBCAM), Yaoundé, Cameroon; Ministry of Public Health, North West Region, Cameroon
Pius Kuwoh, Director, Regional Hospital, Limbe South West Region, Cameroon
Emmanuel Anjonga, Centre for Inclusion Studies, Bamenda, Cameroon
Brenda M.E. Difang, Bamenda Regional Hospital, Bamenda, Cameroon
Shirin Kiani, Handicap International Federation, Erbil, Iraq
Petra S. Muso, St. Elizabeth’s Catholic General Hospital, Shisong, Banso, Cameroon
Navjyot Trivedi, School of Physiotherapy, RK University, Rajkot, India
Julius Sama, Ministry of Public Health, North West Region, Cameroon
Sylvian Teboh, St. Joseph’s Children’s and Adults Home (SAJOCAH), Bafut, Cameroon


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Abstract

Background: Although the adherence to stroke guidelines in high-income countries has been shown to be associated with improved patient outcomes, the research, development and implementation of rehabilitation related guidelines in African countries is lacking.

Objectives: The purpose of this article is to describe how a group of front-line practitioners collaborated with academics and students to develop best practice guidelines (BPG) for the management and rehabilitation of stroke in adult patients in Cameroon.

Method: A working group was established and adapted internationally recognised processes for the development of best practice guidelines. The group determined the scope of the guidelines, documented current practices, and critically appraised evidence to develop guidelines relevant to the Cameroon context.

Results: The primary result of this project is best practice guidelines which provided an overview of the provision of stroke rehabilitation services in the region, and made 83 practice recommendations to improve these services. We also report on the successes and challenges encountered during the process, and the working group’s recommendations aimed at encouraging others to consider similar projects.

Conclusion: This project demonstrated that there is interest and capacity for improving stroke rehabilitation practices and for stroke guideline development in Africa.


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