Original Research

The impact of an inclusive education intervention on learning outcomes for girls with disabilities within a resource-poor setting

Mark Carew, Marcella Deluca, Nora Groce, Sammy Fwaga, Maria Kett
African Journal of Disability | Vol 9 | a555 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ajod.v9i0.555 | © 2020 Mark Carew, Marcella Deluca, Nora Groce, Sammy Fwaga, Maria Kett | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 18 July 2018 | Published: 13 May 2020

About the author(s)

Mark Carew, Leonard Cheshire, London, United Kingdom
Marcella Deluca, Leonard Cheshire, London, United Kingdom
Nora Groce, UCL International Disability Research Centre, London, United Kingdom
Sammy Fwaga, Leonard Cheshire, London, United Kingdom
Maria Kett, UCL International Disability Research Centre, London, United Kingdom


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Abstract

Background: Despite a global commitment to the right to education for persons with disabilities, little is known about how to achieve inclusive education in practice, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where the majority of the world’s people with disabilities reside. Moreover, although exclusion from education is magnified by intersecting gender and socioeconomic inequalities, there is especially little knowledge regarding what approaches to inclusive education are effective amongst girls with disabilities living in resource-poor settings.

Objectives: The objective of this article was to assess the impact of an inclusive education intervention led by a non-governmental organisation (NGO) on the educational attainment of girls with disabilities in the resource-poor Lakes region of Kenya.

Method: A quasi-experimental design was employed, where the literacy and numeracy educational attainment of the intervention and control groups was compared over two time points a year apart (Time 1 and Time 2; total matched N = 353). During this period, activities pertaining to six core components of a holistic inclusive education model were implemented.

Results: Relative to the control group, girls with disabilities in the intervention group reported a greater increase in literacy and numeracy attainment, adjusted for grade and level of functional difficulty.

Conclusion: Findings suggest that the intervention was successful in engendering additional improvements in the educational attainment of girls with disabilities from the resource-poor Lakes region of Kenya. Results highlight both the applicability of NGO-led interventions in settings, where national implementation of inclusive education is constrained, and the potential of taking such interventions to scale.


Keywords

inclusive education; gender; disability; poverty; Kenya

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