Original Research

Family-based activity settings of children in a low-income African context

Sadna Balton, Kitty Uys, Erna Alant
African Journal of Disability | Vol 8 | a364 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ajod.v8i0.364 | © 2019 Sadna Balton, Kitty Uys, Erna Alant | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 07 February 2017 | Published: 23 April 2019

About the author(s)

Sadna Balton, Center for Alternate and Augmentative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; and, Speech Therapy & Audiology, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, Soweto, South Africa
Kitty Uys, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
Erna Alant, Center for Alternate and Augmentative Communication, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; and, Department of Special Education, Indiana University, Bloomington, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: There has been an overwhelming call to improve the understanding of how children develop within an African context as Euro-American definitions of competence have been uncritically adopted as the norm for children in Africa. The activities that children engage in within the family setting are seen as important to understand how children develop within context. The use of activity settings is closely aligned with a strengths-based perspective of family-centred practice and contributes to improved sustainability of intervention.

Objectives: This study that was conducted in Soweto, South Africa, aims to describe activity settings that typically developing young children in low-income African contexts participate in.

Method: A descriptive design using structured interviews was utilised to obtain information about activity settings that children aged 3–5 years and 11 months engaged in. Structured interviews with 90 caregivers were conducted.

Results: Findings show that children participate in a variety of activities with varied participation levels. The types of activities are dependent on the context and perceptions of caregivers.

Conclusion: These findings draw attention to understanding activities that children engage in within the family context.


Keywords

activity settings; culture; family; indigenous knowledge; intervention; contribute; low income; utilised; Euro-American; poor sustainability

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