Original Research

Compliance with spectacle wear among learners with hearing impairment in Ghana

Michael A. Kwarteng, Khathutshelo P. Mashige, Samuel Kyei, Pirindhavellie Govender-Poonsamy, Daniel S.Q Dogbe
African Journal of Disability | Vol 13 | a1314 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ajod.v13i0.1314 | © 2024 Michael A. Kwarteng, Khathutshelo P. Mashige, Samuel Kyei, Pirindhavellie Govender-Poonsamy, Daniel S.Q. Dogbe | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 19 August 2023 | Published: 13 June 2024

About the author(s)

Michael A. Kwarteng, Department of Optometry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Bindura University of Science Education, Bindura, Zimbabwe; Discipline of Optometry, School of Health Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa; and Optometry Unit, Department of Clinical Surgical Science, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine Campus, West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago
Khathutshelo P. Mashige, Discipline of Optometry, School of Health Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
Samuel Kyei, Department of Optometry and Vision Science, School of Allied Health Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana
Pirindhavellie Govender-Poonsamy, Discipline of Optometry, School of Health Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
Daniel S.Q Dogbe, Department of Special Education, Faculty of Education, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana

Abstract

Background: Hearing-impaired learners with refractive problems require correction because poor vision hinders their development and educational pursuits.

Objectives: To determine the level of compliance with spectacle wear in learners with hearing impairment in Ghana.

Method: A descriptive cross-sectional study design was used to investigate the level of compliance with spectacle wear in hearing-impaired learners with uncorrected refractive errors (URE). The participants were from six schools for the hearing impaired, comprising three schools from each sector (Northern and Southern) of Ghana.

Results: Of the 1914 learners screened, 69 (3.61% CI: 2.82–4.54%) had URE. Sixty-two (89.9%) learners with URE had myopia (-0.50 Dioptre Sphere (DS) to -2.00DS), and 7 (10.1%) had hyperopia (+2.00DS to +10.00DS). There were more females (53.6%) with URE than males, and their ages ranged from 8 to 35 years, with a mean of 17.35 ± 5.19 years. Many (56.5%) learners complied with spectacle wear after 3 months of reassessment, with females being more compliant than males, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.544). Learners who complied well with the spectacle wear were those with moderate visual impairment (VI), followed by mild VI, while those with no VI were the least compliant. A significant difference was observed between spectacle compliance and presenting VI (p = 0.023).

Conclusion: The spectacle wear compliance level was high compared to a previous study (33.7%) in Ghana.

Contribution: This study highlights the importance of addressing URE among learners with hearing impairment in Ghana and Africa.


Keywords

spectacle compliance; hearing impairment; visual impairment; refractive error; Ghana

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 3: Good health and well-being

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