Original Research

Disability inclusion in malaria services in western Tanzania: A rapid barrier analysis

Elias C. Nyanza, Anthony Kapesa, Theresia Maduka, Monica T. Madullu
African Journal of Disability | Vol 12 | a1270 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ajod.v12i0.1270 | © 2023 Elias C. Nyanza, Anthony Kapesa, Theresia Maduka, Monica T. Madullu | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 15 June 2023 | Published: 28 November 2023

About the author(s)

Elias C. Nyanza, Department of Environmental, Occupational and Research GIS, School of Public Health, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, Mwanza, Tanzania
Anthony Kapesa, Department of Community Medicine, School of Public Health, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, Mwanza, Tanzania
Theresia Maduka, Department of Environmental, Occupational and Research GIS, School of Public Health, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, Mwanza, Tanzania
Monica T. Madullu, Department of Environmental, Occupational and Research GIS, School of Public Health, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, Mwanza, Tanzania

Abstract

Background: Persons with disabilities generally face greater challenges in accessing healthcare and interventions compared with the general population. Malaria is one of the diseases that can seriously affect individuals with disabilities, as it requires early diagnosis and prompt treatment.

Objective: This study explores the extent to which locally available malaria services and interventions are inclusive of persons with disabilities and identifies associated access barriers.

Method: A qualitative case study focusing on social, cultural and health system factors associated with the inclusion of persons with disabilities in malaria services was conducted in Kigoma Region, western Tanzania. Thematic analysis of emerging themes identified barriers affecting access to locally available malaria services and interventions.

Results: Inclusion of persons with disabilities in planning, implementation and reporting of health issues in different malaria programmes was reported to be limited. Persons with disabilities were unable to access malaria services because of different barriers such as the distance of the service provision sites, communication and information issues and a lack of financial resources.

Conclusion: Persons with disabilities are widely excluded from malaria care provision across the entire health services paradigm, impacting access and utilisation to this vulnerable population. Barriers to malaria service access among persons with disabilities were physical, attitudinal, financial and informational.

Contribution: The findings of this study identify that malaria intervention stakeholders need to take a holistic approach and fully involve individuals with disabilities at all levels and scope of malaria service planning and provision.

 


Keywords

malaria services; persons with disability; barriers; inclusion; vulnerable population

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 10: Reduced inequalities

Metrics

Total abstract views: 904
Total article views: 927


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.