Original Research

Prevalence and levels of disability post road traffic orthopaedic injuries in Rwanda

JC Allen Ingabire, Aimee Stewart, Jean Baptiste Sagahutu, Gerard Urimubenshi, Georges Bucyibaruta, Sonti Pilusa, Carine Uwakunda, Didace Mugisha, Leontine Ingabire, David Tumusiime
African Journal of Disability | Vol 13 | a1251 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ajod.v13i0.1251 | © 2024 JC Allen Ingabire, Aimee Stewart, Jean Baptiste Sagahutu, Gerard Urimubenshi, Georges Bucyibaruta, Sonti Pilusa, Carine Uwakunda, Didace Mugisha, Leontine Ingabire, David Tumusiime | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 10 May 2023 | Published: 18 January 2024

About the author(s)

JC Allen Ingabire, Department of Surgery, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda; and, Department of Surgery, University Teaching Hospital of Kigali, Kigali, Rwanda
Aimee Stewart, Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Jean Baptiste Sagahutu, Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda
Gerard Urimubenshi, Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda
Georges Bucyibaruta, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, United Kingdom
Sonti Pilusa, Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Carine Uwakunda, Department of Surgery, Kibagabaga Level II Teaching Hospital, Kigali, Rwanda
Didace Mugisha, Department of Environmental, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda
Leontine Ingabire, Department of Nursing, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda
David Tumusiime, Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda

Abstract

Background: Prolonged disability resulting from road traffic injuries (RTIs) contributes significantly to morbidity and disease burden. A good understanding of the prevalence and the level of disability of orthopaedic injuries in developing countries is crucial for improvement; however, such data are currently lacking in Rwanda.

Objectives: To determine the prevalence and levels of disability of 2 years post-road traffic orthopaedic injuries in Rwanda.

Method: A multicentre, cross-sectional study from five Rwandan referral hospitals of 368 adult RTI victims’ sustained from accidents in 2019. Between 02 June 2022, and 31 August 2022, two years after the injury, participants completed the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS 2.0) Questionnaire for the degree of impairment and the Upper Extremity Functional Scale and Lower-Extremity Functional Scale forms for limb functional evaluation. Descriptive, inferential statistics Chi-square and multinomial regression models were analysed using R Studio.

Results: The study’s mean age of the RTOI victims was 37.5 (±11.26) years, with a sex ratio M: F:3: 1. The prevalence of disability following road traffic orthopedic injury (RTOI) after 2 years was 36.14%, with victims having WHODAS score > 25.0% and 36.31% were still unable to return to their usual activities. Age group, Severe Kampala Trauma Score and lack of rehabilitation contributed to disability. The most affected WHODAS domains were participation in society (33%) and life activities (28%).

Conclusion: The prevalence and levels of disability because of RTOI in Rwanda are high, with mobility and participation in life being more affected than other WHODAS domains. Middle-aged and socio-economically underprivileged persons are the most affected.

Contribution: This study showed that a good rehabilitation approach and economic support for the RTI victims would decrease their disabilities in Rwanda.

 


Keywords

prevalence; disability; road traffic injuries; rehabilitation; WHODAS 2.0

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 3: Good health and well-being

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